‘Andrei Rublev’ Restoration Trailer: Tarkovsky’s 2nd Feature Gets a Theatrical Re-Release

Following recent theatrical releases and subsequent home releases of a pair of Andrei Tarkosvky restorations, Stalker and The Sacrifice, the new high-definition restoration of the Russian filmmaker’s preferred cut of his second feature Andrei Rublev will be getting the same treatment this summer.

Here’s the official synopsis:

Tracing the life of a renowned icon painter, the second feature by Andrei Tarkovsky vividly conjures the murky world of medieval Russia. This dreamlike and remarkably tactile film follows Andrei Rublev as he passes through a series of poetically linked scenes-snow falls inside an unfinished church, naked pagans stream through a thicket during a torchlit ritual, a boy oversees the clearing away of muddy earth for the forging of a gigantic bell-gradually emerging as a man struggling mightily to preserve his creative and religious integrity. Appearing here in the director’s preferred 183-minute cut the masterwork Andrei Rublev is one of Tarkovsky’s most revered films, an arresting meditation on art, faith, and endurance.

Check out the trailer and poster below.

Janus Films’ Theatrical Re-Release

Andrei Rublev is set open at the Film Society of Lincoln Center on August 24 and is coming to the Criterion Collection on September 25. Keep an ear out for news and dates on the national rollout.

Andrei Tarkosvky's Second Feature

With his second feature, a towering epic that took him years to complete, Andrei Tarkovsky waded deep into the past and emerged with a visionary masterwork. Threading together several self-contained episodes, the filmmaker traces the renowned icon painter Andrei Rublev through the harsh realities of fifteenth-century Russian life, vividly conjuring the dark and otherworldly atmosphere of the age: a primitive hot-air balloon takes to the sky, snow falls inside an unfinished church, naked pagans celebrate the midsummer solstice, a young man oversees the casting of a gigantic bell. Appearing here in Tarkovsky’s preferred 183-minute cut, as well as the version that was originally censored by Soviet authorities, Andrei Rublev is an arresting meditation on art, faith, and endurance, and a powerful reflection on expressive constraints in the director’s own time.